argument from incredulity - appeal to common sense

Fallacies – Argument From Incredulity (Appeal to Common Sense)

"I cannot imagine how this could be true; therefore, it must be false."

argument from fallacy - or fallacy fallacy - illustration - chemistry, chemical equation, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur, water, dihydrogen oxide

Fallacies – Argument From Fallacy (the Fallacy Fallacy)

Assumption that if an argument for some conclusion is fallacious, the conclusion must also be false.

argument from authority fallacy - logical fallacies series - illustration - incompetent math teacher

Fallacies – Argument From Authority (Appeal to Authority or Argumentum Ad Verecundiam)

A claimed authority's support is used as evidence for an argument's conclusion.

Why Jesus Hates Religion: Part 8 – Works and the Wisdom of Men Replace the Spirit

The Bleeding Blogger

Fruit vs. Root

As Christians (either reborn believers or Christians in name only), we often make the mistake of striving to replicate or copy fruit (works) rather than the seeking the root (the Holy Spirit) of those works.*

We take the fruit (some good, some bad) of our forefathers – writings, ideas, theology, creeds, and church practices – the fruit of ancient men and women – and try to copy-paste these things into our lives today. We create doctrines and precepts and rules out of these ancient fruits or good works, neglecting to pursue the heart behind that fruit, a heart which is one with the Spirit of God.

Rather than sitting at the feet of God, we sit at the feet of theologians, Bible commentators, and famous orators. We trust their interpretation of God’s voice more than we trust or listen for God’s own voice. We look to…

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fallacy of division - logic - picture of puzzle pieces, mostly blue, but not entirely

Fallacies – Fallacy of Division

Assuming that something which is true of a thing must also be true of some or all of its parts (reverse of the Fallacy of Composition).

Why Jesus Hates Religion: Part 2 – Ignorance and Enlightenment

The Bleeding Blogger

Ignorance and Enlightenment

The enemy has used both ignorance and “enlightenment” (or the perception of it) to mislead many.

Even thechurch has been used many times to lead people into darkness – or to keep them there.

In the Middle Ages, the Catholic Church capitalized on the ignorance of the laity regarding the truth of the Bible – deceiving and exploiting them for sordid gain. The heart and truth of God was greatly misunderstood, if it was known at all.

And then came an “Age of Enlightenment”, in which God was “reasoned” by some out of existence.

The enemy is clever, and uses the trend of the day to deceive people.

Unfortunately, we sometimes seem to be less clever, either following the trend of the day for the sake of following it, or clinging so tightly to tradition that we miss the truth.

See to…

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picture of whole with different parts (brick wall with bricks of different colors) - composition fallacy - logic

Fallacies – Fallacy of Composition

Assuming that something true of part of the whole must also be true of the whole.

genetic fallacy - fallacies - logic - DNA - deoxyribonucleic acid

Fallacies – Genetic Fallacy

"I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good." - Seneca

circular cause and consequence fallacy - logic - philosophy - reasoning - thinking - argument - rationality - thoughts - picture of spiral

Fallacies – Circular Cause and Consequence

The consequence of the phenomenon is claimed to be its root cause. Example: "Sue is lethargic and has poor hygiene habits, therefore, she is depressed." (In other words, Sue is depressed because she's lethargic and has poor hygiene habits.) Here, the consequences (lethargy, poor hygiene) of the phenomenon (depression) are being claimed as the root …

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argumentum ex silentio (argument from silence) fallacy - logic

Fallacies – Argument from Silence (Argumentum Ex Silentio)

Assuming that because there is a lack of textual or spoken evidence from an authoritative source, a certain claim is true, or vice versa.