#FirstWorldProblems

Piles (or lines) of laundry.

long line of laundry
Photo credit: Pixabay

Low remaining storage space on a smartphone.

phone running low on storage
Photo credit: Pexels

A stuffed refrigerator.

stuffed refrigerator
Photo credit: Pixabay

Messy houses and bedrooms.

messy chaos of books in bedroom
Photo credit: Pexels

Too many choices.

Several options for eyeglasses
Photo credit: Pixabay

Running out of soda, ice cream, or other sugary stuff at a party.

Bowl of sugar
Photo credit: Pixabay

Ugly carpet.

ugly carpet
Photo credit: Pexels

Broken dishwashers.

Dishes piled on counter because of broken dishwasher
Photo credit: Pixabay

This is not to minimize the weight of the inconvenience or hardship caused by some of our first world problems. (Although I might argue that “problems” such as running out of sugar generally aren’t true hardships, and in the end, benefit us rather than causing harm.)

However:

– If my dishwasher is broken, that means I normally have a robotic servant who washes my dishes for me.

– If I have piles of dirty laundry, that suggests that my wardrobe is fairly sizable.

– An ugly carpet means that…I have carpet! My feet are comfortable and warm.

– A chaotic bedroom can only be that way because I have enough material goods with which to make it chaotic.

 

What would you add to this list? What are some other first world problems?


© 2017 Kate Richardson All Rights Reserved

2 thoughts on “#FirstWorldProblems

  1. A Chicken

    Don’t understand the current hardwood trend in design, carpet is wonderful for falling and sleeping on at will 😀

    Dealing with icy roads means having the luxury of modern transportation.

    A broken shaving razor means having access to electricity and power tools.

    Waking up at night to pee means having fresh water and plumbing.

    Speaking in realtime with someone far away means enjoying the convenience of telecom.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great point. 😀 I have fallen asleep on the carpet many times. 😀 Also, thanks for those insightful additions! I hadn’t really thought about things like electric grooming tools or icy roads. And that’s a keen observation about long-distance communication. It can be rough to have to communicate from a distance with a loved one, but the ability to do so at all – and especially in real time – is a wonderful comfort and convenience not available to all.

      Like

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