English Error Pet Peeves

I’ve written a lot of “heavier”, more introspective/reflective posts lately. And this is Reflection Cube, so I guess that fits. 😛

But I thought I’d break things up a bit by sharing some common English errors that torture my soul!!! 😨

Please note that I’m not trying to make fun of anyone. I understand that struggles with English or with learning a language are not uncommon. ❤ And English isn’t exactly the most straightforward language. I definitely make my share of linguistic mistakes. 😛

I will include some simple examples of the incorrect and correct English forms – not with the intention of insulting anyone – but for anyone who might be less familiar or comfortable with the English language, or just confused after hearing and reading the wrong thing so many times.

OK. Here goes. 😀


Mixing-up “are” and “our”

😢 Incorrect: We our going to the museum later.

🙂 Correct: We are going to the museum later.

😢 Incorrect: Are love will never die.

🙂 Correct: Our love will never die.


Saying “For all intensive purposes” instead of “For all intents and purposes”

😢 Incorrect: For all intensive purposes, we are finished with our meeting.

🙂 Correct: For all intents and purposes, we are finished with our meeting.


“Affect” and “Effect”

😢 Incorrect: How did the company’s restructuring effect you?

🙂 Correct: How did the company’s restructuring affect you?

😢 Incorrect: The side affects of consuming this drug may include nausea, headaches, and vision loss.

🙂 Correct: The side effects of consuming this drug may include nausea, headaches, and vision loss.


Using “Chose” Instead of Choose

😢 Incorrect: Tonight, Sam gets to chose the movie.

🙂 Correct: Tonight, Sam gets to choose the movie.


“There”, “Their”, and “They’re”

😢 Incorrect: I’m going to head over their and see what’s going on.

🙂 Correct: I’m going to head over there and see what’s going on. (“There” is a place or location.)

😢 Incorrect: There making fun of me again.

🙂 Correct: They’re making fun of me again. (They are making fun of me again.)

😢 Incorrect: They’re cat isn’t very friendly.

🙂 Correct: Their cat isn’t very friendly. (“Their” indicates possession and belonging.)


“It’s” and “Its”

😢 Incorrect: Never judge a book by it’s cover.

🙂 Correct: Never judge a book by its cover. (Counterintuitive as it may seem, this is one instance where possession does not require an apostrophe.)

😢 Incorrect: Its cold in here.

🙂 Correct: It’s cold in here. (It is cold in here.)


“You’re” and “Your”

😢 Incorrect: Your wrong.

🙂 Correct: You’re wrong. (You are wrong.)

😢 Incorrect: You’re statement is incorrect.

🙂 Correct: Your statement is incorrect.


Using “loose” instead of “lose”

😢 Incorrect: I’m loosing a lot of weight.

🙂 Correct: I’m losing a lot of weight.


“Led” and “lead”

😢 Incorrect: He lead me out of the maze.

🙂 Correct: He led me out of the maze.

This can be confusing, because lead – the element – is pronounced the same way “led” is pronounced, but differently than the way “lead” is pronounced when describing leadership.

“Lead me to the city.” (LEEEED)

“Lead is toxic to humans.” (LEHD)

“The guide led us deep into the cave.” (LEHD)


Using “I” when it should actually be “me” (and vice-versa)

😢 Incorrect: Melissa and me will bring side dishes.

🙂 Correct: Melissa and I will bring side dishes.

(If you try removing Melissa from the sentence, what makes more sense: “Me will bring side dishes”, or “I will bring side dishes”?)

😢 Incorrect: Kelsey is close to Jessica and I.

🙂 Correct: Kelsey is close to Jessica and me.

(If you try removing Jessica from the sentence, what makes more sense: “Kelsey is close to I”, or “Kelsey is close to me”?)


 Saying “eat healthy” rather than “eat healthily”

😢 Incorrect: I try to exercise regularly and eat healthy.

🙂 Correct: I try to exercise regularly and eat healthily.

Healthy” is an adjective, whereas “healthily” is an adverb.

“Healthy” should be followed by the healthy thing you’re eating.

I try to eat healthy…food? Dinners? Sandwiches? Healthy is describing something. It cannot stand alone. It does not describe how you’re eating. Only what you’re eating.

“Healthily”, on the other hand, does describe how you’re eating. Are you eating…carelessly? Cheaply? Expensively? Quickly? Poorly? Or healthily?


Pronouncing “mischievous” as MIS-CHEE-VEE-US, rather than MIS-CHUH-VUS!

“Mischievous” should only be pronounced with three syllables, not four. And no CHEE or VEE. 🙂

“Every kid in that class has a mischievous streak.” (“Every kid in that class has a MIS-CHUH-VUS streak.”)


What did I miss? What English errors do you tend to notice? What’s your #1 English pet peeve? 🙂


© 2017 Kate Richardson All Rights Reserved

 

 

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